Uncategorized


well, it’s kind a bit wierd writing to my other blog. maybe because i got a warning from here. but anyway. i register a new blog in a different site of course but i’ll still continue to write and post stuff here i guess… but till then… i guess i’ll have to lie low for a bit.

hear from me guys later….

Advertisements

Tea equipment is called chadōgu (茶道具; literally “tea tools”). A wide range of chadōgu is necessary for even the most basic style of chanoyu. A full list of all available tea implements and supplies and their various styles and variations could fill a several-hundred-page book. The following is a brief list of some essential components:

  • Chakin (茶巾). The “chakin” is a small rectangular white linen or hemp cloth mainly used to wipe the tea bowl.
 

Two modern “thin tea” bowls

  • Tea bowl (chawan 茶碗; main article: chawan). Tea bowls are available in a wide range of sizes and styles, and different styles are used for thick and thin tea (see Tea ceremony, below). Shallow bowls, which allow the tea to cool rapidly, are used in summer; deep bowls are used in winter. Bowls are frequently named by their creators or owners, or by a tea master. Bowls over four hundred years old are in use today, but only on unusually special occasions. The best bowls are thrown by hand, and some bowls are extremely valuable. Irregularities and imperfections are prized: they are often featured prominently as the “front” of the bowl.
Broken tea bowls are painstakingly repaired using a mixture of lacquer and other natural ingredients. Powdered gold is added to disguise the dark colour of the lacquer, and is known as kintsugi or “joint with gold,” and additional designs are sometimes created with the mixture. Bowls repaired in this fashion are used mainly in November, when tea practitioners begin using the ro, or hearth, again, as an expression and celebration of the concept of wabi, or humble simplicity.
  • Tea caddy (chaire 茶入 and natsume ; main article: chaki). Tea caddies come in two basic styles, the natsume and the chaire, though there is variation in shape, size and colour within the styles. Chaire, which are used for koicha, are usually tall and thin (but shapes may vary significantly) and have ivory lids with gold leaf undersides. Chaire are usually ceramic, and are stored in decorative bags called shifuku. Natsume are mostly used for usucha, and are named for their resemblance to the natsume fruit (the jujube). They are short with a flat lid and rounded bottom, and are usually made of lacquered wood.
  • Tea scoop (chashaku 茶杓). Tea scoops generally are carved from a single piece of bamboo, although they may also be made of ivory or wood. They are used to scoop tea from the tea caddy into the tea bowl. Bamboo tea scoops in the most casual style have a nodule in the approximate center. Larger scoops are used to transfer tea into the tea caddy in the mizuya (preparation area), but these are not seen by guests. Different styles and colours are used in various tea traditions.
  • Tea whisk (chasen 茶筅). This is the implement used to mix the powdered tea with the hot water. Tea whisks are carved from a single piece of bamboo. There are various types. Tea whisks quickly become worn and damaged with use, and the host should use a new one when holding a chakai or chaji.
Old and damaged whisks are not simply discarded. Once a year around May, they are taken to local temples and ritually burned in a simple ceremony called chasen kuyō, which reflects the reverence with which objects are treated in the tea ceremony.

All the tools for tea ceremony are handled with exquisite care. They are scrupulously cleaned before and after each use and before storing.

Lesson 1:

Study of Common Expressions

1. Ohayoo –> Good Morning

2. Konban wa –> Good Evening

3. Konnichi wa –> Good Afternoon

4. Maiban –> Every night or Nightly

5. Mainichi –> every day or Daily

6. Nanji desu ka –> What time is it?

7. Mada ikanai de kudasai –> Please don’t go yet.

8. Kirai desu ka –> Don’t you like it?

9. Tokidoki –> Sometimes

10. Ikura desu ka –> How much is it?

11. Sumimasen –> Please excuse me or Pardon me

12. Nannimo naranai –> Good for nothing

13. Wakarimasu ka –> do you understand?

14. Arigatoo –> Thank You

More Words for Study:

1. otoko –> man                     6. gakkoo –> school

2. onna –> woman                  7. empitsu –> pencil

3. hon –> book                       8. hana –> flower

4. isu –> chair                         9. ottosan –> father

5. inu –> dog                          10. okkasan –> mother